Educating Your Teens About Credit

As children grow into teens and young adults, they need to start learning about building good credit. Not having the proper guidance can lead young people down a path of building debt and poor money management. Starting at home with some principles for good financial management is a great way for parents to help their children grow into responsible adults.

To Begin

Don’t start out with a credit card. The ease of using a credit card makes it far too easy to abuse. Instead, begin by teaching your children how to reconcile their bank statements with a debit card or checks. To help them when they first start out, link your bank account with theirs to avoid surcharges if they have difficulty with the lessons. Remind them to keep their receipts and always be mindful of spending only what they have available.

Have your children take responsibility for their car insurance or other bills that are directly related to their finances. Letting children have this experience of managing an amount while keeping in mind they have bills to pay is a great starting point for making good financial decisions.

Remind children about safety when using a debit card and have them practice watching their bank accounts for fraudulent charges. Encourage them to use an old fashioned record and write every purchase down so they understand the monetary power of a swipe. It’s much easier this day in age to get carried away with swiping a card for small charges that add up quickly. Their card usage should not be based on the “Accepted” notice after they complete a transaction.

Credit Cards

Once you feel comfortable that your children are paying attention to their spending habits and remaining within their limits, it’s time to start building credit. Starting out early with good credit card habits can really give a child a step up when it comes to larger purchases later in life. Holding a credit card is more than an easy and secure way to pay for goods. It will build a credit score to protect your child’s future.

Prepaid Cards

You may not feel comfortable letting your child start out with a debit card. The potential for fraud and overdraft charges is serious. It could also pose a problem if your child has access to a savings account that is intended for the future. Instead of letting him or her access a larger sum, obtain a prepaid card. The card will act as cash that is loaded in a predetermined amount by parents.

Many common credit card companies offer prepaid cards that include features like parental controls (to prevent your child from shopping certain locales), mobile features, and discounts for certain brands. You may encounter fees with the use of prepaid cards, which is a major drawback to using this form of payment. From activation fees to balance inquiry fees and maintenance fees, you might end up spending more than necessary on this form of card.

Joint Credit

If your child is under the age of 18, he or she will not be able to apply for a card without parental approval. As a step toward credit independence, try a joint credit card that is cosigned by a parent. You can choose a low limit level to ensure your child doesn’t immediately start overspending.

Take time when the credit statement arrives each month to go over the activity and let your child know which purchases were valid and which were superfluous. At this point, a card should only be used for purchases that you and your child have agreed upon: emergencies, school-related activities, or buying something they have already saved money to obtain.

Authorized User Cards

Another option is to let your child have a card on your account as a secondary or tertiary cardholder. Sign them up for a parent’s card that the parent can benefit from, too. Make sure to carefully monitor statements for any purchases made on your account to prevent poor money management.

It’s easy for a child to think there are no consequences if he has access to a parent’s account with high limits. Set certain limits on what your child can purchase or how much he or she can spend per month to ensure the card is not abused. Go over your child’s spending with him every month.

Credit for 18 Year Olds

When a child heads off to college, having a credit card can help manage daily expenses in a secure way. Be a part of this first independent credit card venture, if possible. Helping your child learn how to avoid carrying a balance, as well as understanding how to prepare for times when carrying a balance is unavoidable is important. Having to learn these lessons without a parent’s guidance can be intimidating and difficult.

Hopefully the lessons of carrying other cards will pay off when your child opens his or her first independent credit account. Make sure you ask about your child’s credit card habits regularly. If you support your child financially through school, having these continuing conversations is easier and a good way to refresh your child’s memory about good money management.

Managing Consequences

Teaching your child a lesson can be difficult if your child has a hard time spending appropriately. While you don’t want to bail your child out from poor spending decisions, carrying a balance can lead to a financial obligation the parent must ultimately take responsibility for. Go back over a few steps of card management skills if your child mistakenly spends more than he can afford.

Overspending once or twice is understandable when a child starts learning about money management. Consider another payment method if your child has too much difficulty in remaining within appropriate spending limits. Letting spending go unchecked is a recipe for financial disaster. It can lead to your child having to carry a balance that can’t be paid off and that will weaken his or her credit score.

Don’t let a child off the hook for any surcharges or debt incurred, however. Being responsible for paying off debt before your child can use the money for anything else is a good way to let him or her know there are repercussions for poor spending decisions.

 

Consolidate Debt Loans Tips and Info

When your financial well being is threatened by mounting debts and loans, you need to consolidate debt loans. To consolidate debt loans is an easy thing to do. But you will need all the necessary guide, tips and info on how you will go about it. Otherwise you will end up in sorry mess. So having the tips and info to guide in your plans to consolidate debt loans will give a more informed decision.

When people have problems managing their indebtedness and bills, they to debt consolidation loans as recourse. That is not a bad idea. But before you dip your hands in loan or consolidation loan learn as much as you can. Getting tips and info as well guide from the pros can help you a lot when you finally make that decision. Armed with all the tips, guide and info on how to consolidate debt loans, can give a much better strategies when dealing with your lender or bank.

Always bear in mind that the best way to get these tips and info is to go online and gather as much information you can muster. By doing this, will be able to compare and make an analogy accordingly. So when you have face to face with your lender or financial institution counselors or agents you have more power to negotiate a better deal.

Too many people are in dire straits right now in terms of financial well being. Mounting debts and loans plus bills that go with day to day needs is very crippling. I do not blame who are desperately looking for ways on how they can get out of their woes. With all the economic indicators showing the economy is slowing down and recession is likely to come, people are very nervous.

Some lenders are very aggressive and always want to close the deal as soon as possible. Lenders who are always in a hurry to close deals do not want you know more about what they are giving you. So beware of these lenders because they cost you a bundle at the end of the day. Going online to find the best lending institution is your best bet. You can get a lot of tips and info that will guide you on the best strategies to conquer your debt and bill payment problems.

Do not fall prey to all the scam artist and greedy lenders who are only after your hard earn money. Do not make a haste decision even with the strong urging to consummate a transaction, because it could be a trap. And once you have signed the dotted lines, there is no turning back. Tips and info on terms and glossary of terms they use in their programs is vital to getting well informed.
If they offered you something that is too good to true then this is a red flag. Investigate and analyze what they are offering you. You could in for a big surprise.

Online tips, guide and info can give you the right strategies to employ when applying for a debt consolidation loans. And to consolidate debt loans is not a hard and complicated thing to do as long as you have the right information and guide.

 

After a Bankruptcy Has Discharged

For most people, going through bankruptcy brings with it a mix of emotions. On the one hand, there can be a sense of disappointment at having to take such a drastic measure in order to get one’s financial life back on track. There can also be some guilt that comes from not being able to repay debtors, and even a sense of failure.

At the same time, bankruptcy can bring with it huge feeling of relief for finally being out from under all of that debt. In particular, this feeling of relief can be the strongest when you are discharged from owing money to most or all of your creditors.

Defining a Bankruptcy Discharge

A bankruptcy discharge is simply a provision within many bankruptcy arrangements whereby you, the borrower or debtor, are released from any further personal liability for certain types of debts. After your discharge, you are no longer required to repay the qualifying debts.

Furthermore, this is a permanent order, meaning that creditors and collection agencies to which the discharge applies are no longer able to seek repayment from you – including calling you, writing you or seeking legal action in order to collect outstanding debts.

Note that some types of debts – such as those with a valid lien or charge upon a specific property – will remain owed by you even after the discharge. There may be other types of debts, such as some types of student loans, for which you will remain responsible even after the bankruptcy.

The Need for Money after a Discharge

As you know, once you have been through a bankruptcy, for a period of a number of years you will not be able to quality for many types of credit or loans. However, that does not mean you will not have the need for a loan: your need for cash will still be there even after bankruptcy, of course. Fortunately, some lenders special in making personal loans to people in your situation.

If you are wondering how to get a loan after a bankruptcy has discharged, personal loan options abound. Here are 3 personal loan tips for getting funded:

1. Decide whether you want a secured or an unsecured loan:

The first decision you will need to make is whether you should take out a secured or an unsecured personal loan. The main difference is that, with an unsecured loan, you will not need to put up any collateral such as a piece of physical property or a financial instrument such as a funded savings account. However, unsecured loans understandably come with higher average interest rates than do secured ones.

2. Figure out how much you need to borrow and for how long:

Now, decide exactly how much you will need to borrow. It is worth spending some extra time to be precise on this point. After all, you will want to make sure you borrow enough to meet your current cash needs, but you will want to avoid over-borrowing as well.

3. Apply to as many lenders as you can:

Now, it is time to apply to as many bankruptcy-okay personal lenders as you can find. Start by doing an extensive online search for “bankruptcy okay personal loan” and related terms. These lenders are out there and willing to take you on as a customer. Make sure you apply to multiple (e.g., 3-5) lenders, since by doing so you greatly improve your chances of getting a low loan rate.

 

Free Money Saving Auto

Free Auto Loan Tips

The following tips should help increase your chances of getting a car loan at a better rate.

Tip #1 – If you just started a job (recently graduated from college) then wait 6 months to apply for your car loan.

Tip #2 – If you have currently have bad credit then repair it before applying for an auto loan.

Tip #3 – If you’ve recently moved then wait until you have lived at your new address for 6 months before applying for a loan.

Tips #4 – If you have had a previous auto loan or home mortgage on your credit report then your chances for a new loan improve greatly.

Tip #5 – Try and pay off all of your credit card balances or at least lower them. You may want to consider finding the best debt consolidation loans to erase all of your credit card bills. The bottom line is don’t keep a high debt load or credit card balances.

Tip #6 – You must have a stable job or occupation.

Tip #7 – Other examples of credit extended to you should appear on your credit report. Verify this with a quick and easy online credit report. Also avoid charge off’s on your credit report.

Tip #8 – If you’ve filed bankruptcy before then you should wait 3-4 years before trying to get an auto loan.

Free Home Loan Tips

Tip #1 – Make Bi-Monthly Payments: Instead of paying your mortgage with one monthly payment switch to paying half of your loan payment every 2 weeks. The savings comes from the 26 half payments you make which add up to 13 monthly payments versus the regular 12 payments you would normally make in a year. The end result is you save a large sum of money on the interest owed and you’ll own your home a lot sooner!

Tip #2 – Choose a 15 year mortgage instead of a 30 year mortgage: You’ll end up with a higher monthly payment but in the long run you also save tens of thousands of dollars in interest charges, especially if you shop for the best home loans you can afford.

Tip #3 – Mortgage Refinancing: Currently this is the most popular trend. You refinance your mortgage if you can get a rate that is at least one percentage point lower than your existing mortgage rate and plan to keep the new mortgage for several years or more.

Tip #4 – Buy down the rate: The seller or builder, or through innovative pricing, can help you buy down your mortgage rate for one, two, or three years.

Tip #5 – Consider an adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM): If you think you will be in your house for less then 5 years then perhaps you should consider an ARM. An adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) starts with a considerably lower interest rate, but then adjusts every year. This type of loan moves a little bit of the risk away from the lender, and the lender rewards you with a lower rate. Usually these mortgages are capped to rise not more than two percent in any year, and not more than five or six percent for the life of the loan for your protection.